Gutterfly Remembories

Edward .17 .

Gutterfly Remembories
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peacelaughlove-ed:

Oh god, ed.
peacelaughlove-ed:

Oh god, ed.
peacelaughlove-ed:

Oh god, ed.
peacelaughlove-ed:

Oh god, ed.
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slightart:

Liza Feurtado
"Sleepy Girl"
Pan Pastel on Paper
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hdeeah:

a-la-maquina:


Greatest picture I seen on tumblr.

Legit reason to fly a sign…

The world we live in
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huntingvoldemortinamobilelibrary:

if you don’t think this carries an important message about our society then you are what is wrong with human society today
huntingvoldemortinamobilelibrary:

if you don’t think this carries an important message about our society then you are what is wrong with human society today
huntingvoldemortinamobilelibrary:

if you don’t think this carries an important message about our society then you are what is wrong with human society today
huntingvoldemortinamobilelibrary:

if you don’t think this carries an important message about our society then you are what is wrong with human society today
huntingvoldemortinamobilelibrary:

if you don’t think this carries an important message about our society then you are what is wrong with human society today
huntingvoldemortinamobilelibrary:

if you don’t think this carries an important message about our society then you are what is wrong with human society today
huntingvoldemortinamobilelibrary:

if you don’t think this carries an important message about our society then you are what is wrong with human society today
huntingvoldemortinamobilelibrary:

if you don’t think this carries an important message about our society then you are what is wrong with human society today
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starkinglyhandsome:

dollygale:

captain-raptor:

best thing i learned working with and learning about kids: when they do shit like this, especially to something they themselves use and enjoy, leave it there for as long as possible. let them return to the fun thing over and over again so that it sinks in that the thing they did was wrong, they ruined something, and now they can’t have fun because of it and they should never do it again. it teaches them consequence of action and cautiousness.
i did this with a 3-year-old kid i babysat who filled his playstation with peanut butter before i got there, just every time he went back to it and asked why it’s not working, i opened it and pointed to the peanut butter stains and said “you did that” and he says “yeah”, “will it work like that?” “…no”, and when he got it and promised to never put anything but games into a game machine again, his parents bought another and he kept his promise. it works, even at that age.
this was a long and unnecessary rant but so many times i’ve seen parents IMMEDIATELY replace their kids’ toys/electronics that they destroy over and over again and i’m just like NO THEY’RE NOT LEARNING ANYTHING THAT WAY 

they also don’t learn from being thrown into fires

yeah but they’re quieter that way
starkinglyhandsome:

dollygale:

captain-raptor:

best thing i learned working with and learning about kids: when they do shit like this, especially to something they themselves use and enjoy, leave it there for as long as possible. let them return to the fun thing over and over again so that it sinks in that the thing they did was wrong, they ruined something, and now they can’t have fun because of it and they should never do it again. it teaches them consequence of action and cautiousness.
i did this with a 3-year-old kid i babysat who filled his playstation with peanut butter before i got there, just every time he went back to it and asked why it’s not working, i opened it and pointed to the peanut butter stains and said “you did that” and he says “yeah”, “will it work like that?” “…no”, and when he got it and promised to never put anything but games into a game machine again, his parents bought another and he kept his promise. it works, even at that age.
this was a long and unnecessary rant but so many times i’ve seen parents IMMEDIATELY replace their kids’ toys/electronics that they destroy over and over again and i’m just like NO THEY’RE NOT LEARNING ANYTHING THAT WAY 

they also don’t learn from being thrown into fires

yeah but they’re quieter that way
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"If I let you in, you’ll just want out."
Damn, close to a 10 word story.  (via and-there-is-no-hope)
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poppyslovingyou:

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.
Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation
This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others
This is a child born right next to that culture
Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do
Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

Don’t send her to school when she is older.
Mean Girls will happen
poppyslovingyou:

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.
Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation
This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others
This is a child born right next to that culture
Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do
Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

Don’t send her to school when she is older.
Mean Girls will happen
poppyslovingyou:

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.
Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation
This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others
This is a child born right next to that culture
Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do
Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

Don’t send her to school when she is older.
Mean Girls will happen
poppyslovingyou:

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.
Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation
This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others
This is a child born right next to that culture
Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do
Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

Don’t send her to school when she is older.
Mean Girls will happen
poppyslovingyou:

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.
Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation
This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others
This is a child born right next to that culture
Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do
Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

Don’t send her to school when she is older.
Mean Girls will happen
poppyslovingyou:

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.
Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation
This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others
This is a child born right next to that culture
Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do
Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

Don’t send her to school when she is older.
Mean Girls will happen
poppyslovingyou:

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.
Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation
This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others
This is a child born right next to that culture
Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do
Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

Don’t send her to school when she is older.
Mean Girls will happen
poppyslovingyou:

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.
Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation
This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others
This is a child born right next to that culture
Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do
Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

Don’t send her to school when she is older.
Mean Girls will happen
poppyslovingyou:

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.
Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation
This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others
This is a child born right next to that culture
Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do
Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

Don’t send her to school when she is older.
Mean Girls will happen
poppyslovingyou:

chesireclam:

arcanacat:

allthingshyper:

smallworldofbigal:

ashleymater:

Tippi Benjamine Okanti Degré, daughter of French wildlife photographers Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert, was born in Namibia. During her childhood she befriended many wild animals, including a 28-year old elephant called Abu and a leopard nicknamed J&B. She was embraced by the Bushmen and the Himba tribespeople of the Kalahari, who taught her how to survive on roots and berries, as well as how to speak their language.
Learn more

in before tumblr screams about cultural appropiation

This doesn’t even count as cultural appropriation
This isn’t a person robbing a culture, to hell with the others
This is a child born right next to that culture
Who was embraced by the people and taught how to do some of the things they do
Which is not the same as cultural appropriation

No cultural appropriation. Just something really beautiful.

I love the picture where she’s cuddling a frog.

Don’t send her to school when she is older.
Mean Girls will happen
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